Summary Judgment in a Contested Accounting Proceeding- Disposing of Meritless Objections

Courts often use the term “punctilio of honor” to describe the high level of care and attention required of a fiduciary. The fiduciary must always act cautiously and carefully. But even the most careful fiduciary may still encounter an objection to her actions. There may be a disgruntled family member looking to harass the fiduciary or a party looking to squeeze the estate for some extra cash. Whatever the motive behind the objection, the “punctilio of honor” standard creates a low burden for a party to contest the account. Thankfully, the fiduciary may move for summary judgment to dismiss meritless objections in a contested accounting proceeding.

The summary judgment standard is the same as in any other case. The standard is found in CPLR 3212 and outlined in Zuckerman. First, the fiduciary must establish her defense sufficiently to warrant the court as a matter of law to direct judgment in her favor, and she must do so by tendering evidentiary proof in admissible form (see CPLR 3212 [b]; Zuckerman v City of New York, 49 NY2d 557, 562 [1980]). If the fiduciary meets this burden, the burden shifts to the opposing party to show facts sufficient to require a trial of any issue of fact (see CPLR 3212 [b]; see Zuckerman, 49 NY2d at 562).

In terms of practice, the fiduciary satisfies her initial burden by showing that the account is complete and accurate (see Matter of Assimakopoulos, 2017 NY Slip Op 32821[U] [Sur Ct, New York County 2017]). This is often done by submitting the account with an affidavit attesting to its accuracy (id.; see Estate of Curtis, 16 AD3d 725 [3d Dept 2005]). The fiduciary should therefore submit the pleadings, the account, and the affidavit in support of the account. To avoid any doubt, the fiduciary should also submit additional affidavits addressing each specific objection to the account and tender sworn testimony and other exhibits in support of her position. This will provide the fiduciary with the best chance of success on the motion.

If the fiduciary meets her initial burden, the objectant will have to tender admissible evidence to establish that the amounts set forth in the account are inaccurate or incomplete (Estate of Curtis, 16 AD3d at 726; Matter of Assimakopoulos, 2017 NY Slip Op 32821[U] [Sur Ct, New York County 2017]). This procedure smokes out the weak objections from the strong ones and requires the objectant to prove that each objection is strong enough to justify conducting a trial.

As part of the motion strategy, the fiduciary should always serve the motion with enough notice to permit her to demand that answering papers be served at least a week before the return date. This will provide the fiduciary with a chance to review the answering papers and provide a reply. The fiduciary’s reply should highlight the lack of evidentiary support behind the objections and the golden rule set forth in CPLR 3212 and Zuckerman that “mere conclusions, expressions of hope or unsubstantiated allegations or assertions are insufficient” for an objectant to withstand dismissal (Zuckerman v City of New York, 49 NY 2d at 562).

Goodbye, objections. Goodbye.

By |2019-05-16T11:15:02-04:00May 16th, 2019|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments